Skip to main content
Feb 26, 2016 / Haseeb Jamal -

5 Travel Myths You Need to Stop Believing Right Now

Feb 26, 2016 / Haseeb Jamal -

Canal Comes Alive with Lighted Boat Parade.

Types of Pavements - Flexible Pavement / Rigid Pavement

By: Haseeb Jamal / On: Mar 24, 2017 / Notes, Types of, Definition, Advantages
 
 

Following are the two main types of pavements:

  1. Flexible pavement
  2. Rigid pavement

Flexible pavement:

Are those pavements which reflect the deformation of subgrade and the subsequent layers to the surface.

Rigid pavement:

The rigid characteristic of the pavement are associated with rigidity or flexural strength or slab action so the load is distributed over a wide area of subgrade soil.

Flexible pavement:

Definition

Flexible pavements are those pavements which reflect the deformation of subgrade and the subsequent layers to the surface. Flexible, usually asphalt, is laid with no reinforcement or with a specialized fabric reinforcement that permits limited flow or repositioning of the roadbed under ground changes.

aThe design of flexible pavement is based on load distributing characteristic of the component layers. The black top pavement including water & gravel bound macadam fall in this category.

aFlexible pavement on the whole has low or negligible flexible strength flexible in their structural action). The flexible pavement layers transmit the vertical or compressive stresses to the lower layers by grain transfer through contact points of granular structure.

The vertical compressive stress is maximum on the pavement surface directly under the wheel load and is equal to contact pressure under the wheels. Due to the ability to distribute the stress to large area in the shape of truncated cone the stresses get decreased in the lower layer.

aAs such the flexible pavement may be constructed in a number of layers and the top layer has to be strongest as the highest compressive stresses.

aTo be sustained by this layer, in addition to wear and tear, the lower layer have to take up only lesser magnitude of stress as there is no direct wearing action due to traffic loads. Therefore, inferior material with lower cast can be used in the lower layers.

Rigid pavement: Definition

The rigid characteristic of the pavement are associated with rigidity or flexural strength or slab action so the load is distributed over a wide area of subgrade soil. Rigid pavement is laid in slabs with steel reinforcement.

aThe rigid pavements are made of cement concrete either plan, reinforced or prestressed concrete.

aCritical condition of stress in the rigid pavement is the maximum flexural stress occurring in the slab due to wheel load and the temperature changes.

aRigid pavement is designed and analyzed by using the elastic theory.

Advantages of Rigid Pavement

  1. Rigid lasts much, much longer i.e 30+ years compared to 5-10 years of flexible pavements.

  2. In the long run it is about half the cost to install and maintain. But the initial costs are somewhat high.

  3. Rigid pavement has the ability to bridge small imperfections in the subgrade.

  4. Less Maintenance cost and Continuous Traffic and Flow.

  5. High efficiency in terms of functionality

Comparison of Flexible and Rigid Pavement

  1. Deformation in the sub grade is transferred to the upper layers
  2. Design is based on load distributing characteristics of the component layers
  3. Have low flexural strength
  4. Load is transferred by grain to grain contact
  5. Have low completion cost but repairing cost is high
  6. Have low life span
  7. Surfacing cannot be laid directly on the sub grade but a sub base is needed
  8. No thermal stresses are induced as the pavement have the ability to contract and expand freely
  9. Thats why expansion joints are not needed
  10. Strength of the road is highly dependent on the strength of the sub grade
  11. Rolling of the surfacing is needed
  12. Road can be used for traffic within 24 hours
  13. Force of friction is less Deformation in the sub grade is not transferred to the upper layers.
  1. Deformation in the sub grade is not transferred to subsequent layers
  2. Design is based on flexural strength or slab action
  3. Have high flexural strength
  4. No such phenomenon of grain to grain load transfer exists
  5. Have low repairing cost but completion cost is high
  6. Life span is more as compare to flexible
  7. Surfacing can be directly laid on the sub grade
  8. Thermal stresses are more vulnerable to be induced as the ability to contract and expand is very less in concrete
  9. That's why expansion joints are needed
  10. Strength of the road is less dependent on the strength of the sub grade
  11. Rolling of the surfacing in not needed
  12. Road cannot be used until 14 days of curing
  13. Force of friction is high
 

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.

Search AboutCivil

Related Content